09Nov

Got Breath?
Bad breath (a.k.a. oral malodor/fetor oris/halitosis) is a very common but insidious human predicament, in that it is rarely experienced by the offender. Since it is so personal, the one having it may never get a clue from those affected by it.

Studies indicate that this condition arises directly from either exhaled digestive gases, various conditions within the mouth, or a combination of both. Dental plaque bacteria that reside between the teeth and gums, tongue, and cheeks can absorb certain foods that have a high content of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC's). This alone can be offensive, especially the morning after a meal high in VSC's. Aside from the foods that have a high content of VSC's, the plaque by itself that causes gum disease (periodontal disease or pyorrhea), is definitely the most common cause of bad breath. Add to this, high VSC foods such as garlic, etc., and you have a walking halitosis factory - an offender usually not "in the know".

16Sep

How We Deal With all patients with Bleeding Gums
It is well known that diabetes is associated with inflammation in the body.  To put gum inflammation into perspective, the combined surface area of bleeding gums of a person scoring high in the number of bleeding areas would be equivalent to the area of the palm of their hand.    

For some time now, we have seen amazing results with our non-surgical approach to stopping gum infection and inflammation.  Each patient has individualized needs, and these are determined through:

  1. A complete medical and dental history
  2. Thorough oral examination, including x-rays of teeth and surrounding bone
  3. Measurements of the spaces between the teeth and gums (periodontal pocket depth measuring)
  4. Phase microscope plaque assessment
  5. Blood marker testing including:
  6. Fasting Blood Glucose
    • Hb1Ac
    • Lipid profile
    • C Reactive Protein
  7. Neutraceutical Supplementation
  8. Laser pocket sterilization
  9. Bacterial elimination rinses

What is exciting is that we routinely see reductions in the above mentioned blood test markers due to the elimination of gum inflammation and infection.   

The formation of plaque on the teeth is the first step toward periodontal disease. Plaque, the white sticky substance that collects between teeth, is often the start of periodontitis. Made of microorganisms, dead skin cells and leukocytes (infection fighting white blood cells), it can be removed by brushing and flossing regularly. If it is allowed to build up, it will harden and turn into tartar. Tartar can only be removed with a professional cleaning at the dentist's office. Both plaque and tartar make the gums vulnerable to infection.
If an infection enters the gums it is referred to as gingivitis, the first stage of periodontitis. Bacteria that collect and breed at the gum line and the groove between the gum and the tooth cause the gums to redden, swell and bleed. This response is normal but can also lead to periodontitis. Gums affected by gingivitis often bleed and are sensitive, but not always. Other signs include swollen gums, loose teeth, a bad taste in the mouth and persistent bad breath.