24Feb
(continued) The second test that helps us determine your systemic health risk is Average Blood Surgar(HbA1c). On those occasions when blood glucose is high, the hemoglobin in the blood may be marked or "glycated." The percentage of the hemoglobin that is glycated is an indication of your level of glucose control over the last two months. A value of less than 5% is normal, a value over 7% is considered diabetic, and 6%-7% is considered prediabetic. Since periodontal bacteria in the bloodstream can increase blood sugar and HbA1c levels, treating the periodontal disease will reduce HbA1c scores and lower your diabetes risk.
The results of these tests will be reviewed with you at your next appointment. At that time we will create a plan for your health. The good news is you can choose to replace the vicious cycle with the health cycle.
22Feb
Knowing you have periodontal disease is the first step. The next step toward health is to determine if the disease is impacting your systemic health. There are two simple "finger stick" tests done at the Dental Wellness Center which will help you determine your systemic health risk. The tests are: High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP). C-Reactive Protein is a protein produced in the liver that circulates in the blood. CRP levels increase when the body is fighting off an infection or when inflammation is present. Blockages in blood vessels called plaque are collections of products contained in cells, including CRP. Elevated levels of CRP may predict risk of heart attack up tp eight years in advance, can also increase the risk of a heart attack by seven fold, and are also an indication of cancerous activity. While most people over the age of 40 have annual cholesterol testing, CRP testing is new. Since 50% of people who have heart attackes or stroke have normal cholesterol levels, adding CRP testing can increase the predictability of heart attack or stroke. If you have High CRP because of inflammation, removing the inflammation can lower the CRP and may reduce the risk of future coronary events.
16Sep

How We Deal With all patients with Bleeding Gums
It is well known that diabetes is associated with inflammation in the body.  To put gum inflammation into perspective, the combined surface area of bleeding gums of a person scoring high in the number of bleeding areas would be equivalent to the area of the palm of their hand.    

For some time now, we have seen amazing results with our non-surgical approach to stopping gum infection and inflammation.  Each patient has individualized needs, and these are determined through:

  1. A complete medical and dental history
  2. Thorough oral examination, including x-rays of teeth and surrounding bone
  3. Measurements of the spaces between the teeth and gums (periodontal pocket depth measuring)
  4. Phase microscope plaque assessment
  5. Blood marker testing including:
  6. Fasting Blood Glucose
    • Hb1Ac
    • Lipid profile
    • C Reactive Protein
  7. Neutraceutical Supplementation
  8. Laser pocket sterilization
  9. Bacterial elimination rinses

What is exciting is that we routinely see reductions in the above mentioned blood test markers due to the elimination of gum inflammation and infection.   

The formation of plaque on the teeth is the first step toward periodontal disease. Plaque, the white sticky substance that collects between teeth, is often the start of periodontitis. Made of microorganisms, dead skin cells and leukocytes (infection fighting white blood cells), it can be removed by brushing and flossing regularly. If it is allowed to build up, it will harden and turn into tartar. Tartar can only be removed with a professional cleaning at the dentist's office. Both plaque and tartar make the gums vulnerable to infection.
If an infection enters the gums it is referred to as gingivitis, the first stage of periodontitis. Bacteria that collect and breed at the gum line and the groove between the gum and the tooth cause the gums to redden, swell and bleed. This response is normal but can also lead to periodontitis. Gums affected by gingivitis often bleed and are sensitive, but not always. Other signs include swollen gums, loose teeth, a bad taste in the mouth and persistent bad breath.